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Author:  Hollow
November 26, 2008



 

 

Nexuiz on Debian Linux

Nexuiz on Debian Linux.

When I first got in to Linux as a hobby many years ago, and just like many others did, gaming was an un-spoken subject. I wanted to play Half Life and Counter Strike in Linux and I was pretty much told to forget it. Not being the sort of person to really just forget anything, I didn’t, instead I installed Wine (I think it was on version 0.2 or something back then I can’t remember), and proceeded to install Steam and HL, then CS. Sure enough the graphics had serious issues, there was no sound and I seemed to always have a huge ping on the servers I joined. So I gave it up as a bad job, but safe in the knowledge that Wine would improve and some day I’d be able to play all my favorite games in Linux.

Nexuiz on Debian Linux

Nexuiz on Debian Linux.

Well that day hasn’t quite come yet, we still can’t play EVERYTHING or run EVERY program from Windows in Wine, but we’re getting bloody close now. I can play CSS and HL2 seemlessly in Wine, sound works, graphics are fine, installers, save games etc, everything just works, you can now run programs like Photoshop CS2 (CS3 kinda works I’m told) and Dreamweaver CS2 without any problems that would really phase you and now that the Quake and Doom engines have been OSS’d there are all sorts of open source games, released under the GPL, that are freely available to play on Linux without the aid of Wine.

Nexuiz on Debian Linux

Nexuiz on Debian Linux.

Nexuiz is one I’vebeen toying with recently, it was actually my partner who brought it to my attention, she was looking through the lists of open source programs on wikipedia and just for a laugh decided to take a look at games, she spotted nexuiz and told me to try it on my Debian Lenny system. I was a little apprehensive as I run dual screens and that never seems to work well for games in Linux, but I apt-get install nexuiz anyway. Once installed I disabled my second monitor (Who needs it anyway when you’re gaming and it’s easy as you like with the Nvidia-Settings-Manager these days) and loaded up the game expecting to see a re-vamped Alien Arena or Open Arena, I was surprised to say the least.

Nexuiz on Debian Linux

Nexuiz on Debian Linux.

Nexuiz on Debian Linux

Nexuiz on Debian Linux.

This game is brilliant, yes it looks like it might use the quake engine but I don’t care, it’s just so good. Incredibly playable, the menus work great, the graphics are brilliant and I was just immediately hooked. I played for about half an hour before I remembered I had work to do and reluctantly turned the game off, re-enabled my second screen and began coding again.

The reason for this post, is now to put more propoganda out there for Linux, but to make some of the Linux users realise that just because we can’t run Windows games all the time and perfectly in Linux, doesn’t mean there aren’t alternatives out there ready and waiting for us. So if you’re using a Debian or Debian-based system, go ahead and apt-get install nexuiz and try it out for yourself, let me know how you get on and whether you liked the game or not.


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Author:  Hollow
November 20, 2008



 

 

Debian (Lenny) Linux - Beta2 is now my desktop OS

Well anyone who read my review of Lenny last month will probably have expected this, but I’ve dumped my 64bit installation of Ubuntu Hardy in favor of Debian 5.0 (Lenny). I couldn’t be happier in all honesty, it runs faster (Even though it’s only x86/32 bit as opposed to 64 bit like Ubuntu was), it looks nicer, it does what I tell it to (Sort of) and I feel like a grown up again instead of a newbie using an easy OS. No offense to newbies but you are who Ubuntu is designed for to be fair.

Debian (Etch) Linux Default (Fresh Install) Desktop Screenshot. Click to enlarge.

Debian (Lenny) FF3 Installed - Screenshot.

You can see in the screenshot to the right that I’ve managed to install FF3 instead of being forced to use IceWeasle, which I’m sorry I don’t care who you are or how much you tell me it’s the same, it isn’t ok so shutup! lol. Anyway the point being that Lenny does have it’s downfalls when it comes to installing some programs and drivers that are very easy on Ubuntu/Kubuntu Hardy. For example, when you install Kubuntu Hardy and you have an Nvidia card, Ubuntu pops up and says “I see you have an Nvidia card, would you like to install the drivers for it?” You click yes and you’re on your way, with Lenny however you log into your system and there’s no such pop-up, so you say, “Lenny, I have an Nvidia card and I’d like to install it please”, to which Lenny promptly replies, “Well drop to console and work for it bitch!” Obviously you understand Lenny isn’t a real person and it doesn’t actually talk to you in voice by default, but I had to do it that way for the joke to work. :D

I’ve installed all my usual programs, like Yakuake (Screenshot below, which also includes my dual screen spanning desktop just for good measure), Filezilla, Thunderbird, aMSN, Opera, Netscape, Flock and a host of other simpler but neccessity applications for me like, Flash player, VLC, MPlayer, Audacity etc.

Lenny Yakuake - Screenshot.

Lenny Yakuake - Screenshot.

This last few weeks has seen lots of change in the world, our own fair New Zealand has taken a new government, America elected a new saviour, sorry I mean president, I mean, well you get the point, so I decided it was time for the Symsys-Kubuntu-804 machine to become Symsys-Lenny instead. Change is good!

After installing my applications and installing the wonderful “Breathless” Icon theme, I changed a couple of fonts, uninstalled Open Office 2.4 and installed 3.0 from debs I already had, then decided I’d blog about how great it was.

Lenny 'K' Menu - Screenshot..

Lenny 'K' Menu - Screenshot

So the long and short of this installation is that Nvidia drivers are not yet very easy to install in Lenny, unless you install them immediately after installing your system, unfortunately if you do that you’ll need to re-install them once you update to the 2.6.26 kernel, which will have been compiled from gcc-4.1 and if you’ve updated your kernel you’ve most likely upgraded gcc to gcc-4.3 or higher and the compilation of the Nvidia Kernel module will fail because of that very fact, so just a quick tip for those others out there googling this problem (And I found a few myself during the process as I had other errors too), make sure to download the absolute latest drivers from the Nvidia site, now you won’t be able to do that easily either, their site is now entirely flash/java and doesn’t tend to work well with Konqueror, Opera, Firefox or Netscape until the Nvidia drivers are actually installed (Dumb right?), anyway, visit http://www.nvidia.com/downloads and you’ll get what you need. Once you’ve got the latest drivers from Nvidias site, drop to console (Closing the GUI all together I mean here not just bring up Konsole or dropping to Ctrl Alt F4) make sure you have the correct linux-sources and build-essential installs, then type apt-get install gcc-4.1 then export CC=”gcc-4.1″ then immediately after that cd /usr/src && sh ./NVIDIA*.run agree to the license, say no to downloading a pre-compiled kernel and say ok (No other option) to compiling a new kernel, hopefully all should be well. Obviously don’t take this as a guide to installing Nvidia drivers by default because you may find that they install just fine for you if you have a newer release of Lenny, or a .deb package to install them with etc.

I might actually write a blog about the nvidia drivers installation with a few hints and tips on troubleshooting as well for those who get lost. Have a look for it in the menu on the right, if you can’t find it in there I haven’t written it yet so just stick a comment below here to give me a jab to do it.

I’m really really really impressed with Lenny and I couldn’t be happier to get rid of Kubuntu 64bit, now that’s something I never thought I’d say, Ubuntu/Kubuntu has always been so easy to install and easy to maintain but lately I’ve just been feeling frustrated, it’s so much harder to do “power user stuff” in Ubuntu now BECAUSE it’s so much easier to do the easy stuff. Now that Debian have given us Lenny with a fantastic installer, a brilliant package of programs out of the box and you still have the genious that is aptitude and synaptic if you want to install it, then I think I can now safely say that Debian is well and truly the Ubuntu for professionals and power users, although some may take offense at that so let’s say Ubuntu is the Debian for newbies, but no wait other people will be offended at that, hmmmmmmmmmm, well I like both, I prefer Debian for my pro stuff and Ubuntu for my clients that aren’t so technically minded, yeah that works :D.


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